Youth Group Environmental Education Programs

GAC - GTSWMD

Free Scout Programs:

Making Recycled Paper: (Paper and Pulp) Students will learn how paper is recycled by participating in making a sheet of handmade paper.  They will also construct a timeline of the history of papermaking.

Recycling Games: (Environmental Science) Select 2 or 3 of these fun environmental games to learn more about recycling:  Earth Bingo, Science Bingo, Clever Catch Ball Game, and Recycle Sort.  Additionally all participants will spin the wheel to win a recycled prize.

Making a Difference: (Citizenship and Environmental Activism) Leave No Trace –Exploring Trash Disposal.  This litter cleanup activity is a great way for scouts to volunteer in their community and make a difference.  So select an area for your group to clean and we will do a litter hunt together.  Trash bags, safety vests, and gloves provided.  Scouts will also learn how long it takes for items to decompose through a fun group activity.

E Waste and Household Hazardous Waste: (Sustainability/Environmental Science) Held at the Solid Waste District Office on Wednesdays only during the months of May –October.  Bring us your old HHW to recycle and tour our collection facility (open till 6:00 PM).  Then meet in our conference room to discuss E -Waste and experiment with safe HHW alternatives.

What’s Your Carbon Footprint?: (Sustainability) In going about our daily lives —everyone uses some means of transportation, have homes, purchases food and goods which all contributes to the greenhouse gas emissions that are causing climate change.  By taking the carbon footprint quiz, students will learn that there are many things each of us, as individuals, can do to reduce our carbon emissions.  They will then break into groups to play the Lorax carbon footprint board game. 

ECO-Villains: (Environmental Science): Scouts will learn about different types of human pollution and the impact on communities.  They will then identify a specific problem and work in groups to create eco-villain wanted posters to place throughout the community.

Program Scheduling:

  • All programs are conducted by the Geauga-Trumbull Solid Waste Management District and are free of charge.  But to schedule a program please have at least 10 participants.
  • Please allow 45 minutes to 1 hour for each program.
  • You can select the location of the program, or any of the above programs can be held at the Solid Waste District Office, 5138 Enterprise Blvd., Warren.  To schedule contact Holly Carine at 330-675-2673 ext. 102 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • All of the activities can be geared to helping scouts earn Merit Badges in Environmental Science, Sustainability, Nature, Citizenship in the Community, Pulp and Paper and Plant Science
  • Scouts can help their natural world by participating in a litter cleanup as a service project.  Sign up for the Great American Cleanup at www.startrecycling.com

Daisy “Clover Petal” Night

Wednesday, March 29, 2017
6:00 pm to 7:30 pm
Held at the Geauga-Trumbull Solid Waste Management District’s Office
5138 Enterprise Blvd., Warren, Ohio 44481

Activities at this session will allow you to earn your Clover Petal, “Use resources wisely”. 

  • Listen to Clover’s Story “A Visit to the Busy, Buzzy Bees “and discuss how clover is resourceful.
  • Discuss how old things can be used to make new items, and how important it is to recycle. A paper recycling demonstration will take place.
  • Using recycled paper and other materials, the girls will make a flower poster.
  • Each participant will then decorate an old ice cream bucket to collect and reuse rain water or make a bird feeder out of an old 2 liter pop bottle. (Girls must bring a 2 liter pop bottle.)  Please select one when registering.

This program is limited to 15 girls at each session. So depending on your group size more than one scout troop may attend.

Registration is on a first come first serve basis and must be done by emailing the District’s Education Specialist, Holly Carine at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Or call 330-675-2673 Ext. 102.

Registration deadline: March 17, 2017

All activity supplies will be provided but feel free to bring a snack and drink.

Household Elf Badge Night

April 26, 2017
6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Held at the Geauga-Trumbull Solid Waste Management District’s Office
5138 Enterprise Blvd., Warren, Ohio 44481

Activities at this session include:

  • Making a recycled draft stopper to save energy.
  • Making a sign to remind your family to turn off the water while brushing their teeth to save water.
  • Making a natural glass cleaner and testing it out on a mirror to go natural.
  • Select a site to conduct a plastic bag recycling program and then decorate a recycle box to collect them in to reuse and recycle. We will also play the “garbage breakdown” guessing game.
  • Making a natural fresh scent closet deodorizer to clear the air.
  • This program is limited to 20 Brownies at each session, so depending on your group size more than one scout troop may attend.

Registration is on a first come first serve basis and must be done by emailing the District’s Education Specialist, Holly Carine at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Or call 330-675-2673 Ext. 102.

Registration deadline: April 7, 2017

Bring a snack and drink if you like, and an old necktie for the door draft craft.  All other activity supplies will be provided.

Adult Programs

Adult Programs can be requested anytime during the year. They will cover the following top 10 items to recycle and all local community collection programs offered by the District. Contact the District’s Education Specialist at 330-675-2673 ext. 102 to schedule a program or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

So Get to Know the Top 10!

Recycling is one of the most important things we can do to preserve our planet. On a daily basis, more than 100 million Americans participate in recycling used and old materials in their household and offices.

Are you one of them? Or are you trying to sort which items you can recycle and which ones belong in the compost or the garbage?

To help you out, the National Recycling Coalition has put together a list the top ten most important items to recycle.

#1: Aluminum. This is because aluminum cans are 100 percent recyclable and can also be recycled over and over again. Even better, turning recycled cans into new cans takes 95 percent less energy than making brand-new ones. So how about starting with all those soda and juice cans?

#2: PET Plastic Bottles. Americans will buy about 25 billion single-serving bottles of water this year, according to the Container Recycling Institute. Worse yet, nearly 80 percent of those bottles will end up in a landfill. Let’s put a stop to that. Making plastic out of recycled resources uses about two-thirds less energy than making new plastic. And because plastic bottles, more than any other type of plastic, are the most commonly used type, they are usually the easiest to recycle.

#3: Newspaper. This is a pretty obvious one, right? It seems like a no-brainer to set up a recycling bin next to your garbage can for newspaper and any other scrap paper. So why should we recycle paper? According to the Environmental Protection Agency, paper makes up about one-third of the all the municipal waste stream in the U.S. That’s a whole lot of paper, and since we know that recycling all that paper conserves resources, saves energy, and doesn’t clog up the landfills, there’s no reason not to do it.
Once you have those in place, let’s move on to the rest of our list.

#4: Corrugated Cardboard. Old corrugated cardboard (OCC) represents a significant percentage of the commercial solid waste stream. In 1996, the U.S. generated 29 million tons of OCC, or 13.8% of our municipal waste stream. Approximately 90% of that comes from the commercial or non-residential sector, the places where we work. So next time UPS delivers a big box to your office be sure to break it down and recycle it. (After you’ve emptied it, of course.)

#5: Steel cans. Just like aluminum, steel products can be recycled over again without compromising the quality of the steel. We’re talking about steel cans, but maybe you have some steel auto parts or appliances ready for recycling too? More than 80 million tons of steel is recycled each year in North America, and recycling steel saves the equivalent energy to power 18 million households a year. You can learn more about steel recycling by visiting the Steel Recycling Institute website.

#6: HDPE plastic bottles. (HDPE stands for high-density polyethylene, a common and more dense plastic, which is used for detergents, bleach, shampoo, milk jugs.) HDPE plastics are identified by the logo on the bottom of the container. (Three arrows in the shape of a triangle.) Check the number inside that logo: numbers 1 and 2 are recyclable almost everywhere, but 3 through 7 are only recyclable in limited areas. And don’t forget to rinse and clean all of your HDPE containers in the sink. Any remaining dirt or food particles can contaminate the recycling process.

#7: Glass containers. Recycled glass saves 50 percent energy versus virgin glass, and recycling just one glass container saves enough energy to light a 100-watt bulb for four hours. Recycled glass generates 20 percent less air pollution and 50 percent less water pollution, and one ton of glass made from 50 percent recycled materials saves 250 pounds of mining waste. Wow!

#8 & 9: Magazines and Mixed paper. There are so many reasons to recycle all kinds of paper that it makes no sense not to. First, recycled paper saves 60 percent of energy versus virgin paper, and also generates 95 percent less air pollution. Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees and 7,000 gallons of water. Sadly, though, every year Americans throw away enough paper to make a 12-foot wall from New York to California. Let’s work on changing that!

#10: Computers. Computers can be recycled in a couple of ways, depending on the state of the machine. Giving old, working computers to friends and family members or donating them to nonprofit organizations not only keeps the computer entirely out of the waste stream, but it presents computer access to someone who might not otherwise be able to afford it. Non-working computers can be sent to recycling centers where they are dismantled and valuable components are recovered.